TJ’s Household Challenge Tray Chic

I picked up this tin tray in Versailles and is the closest I am ever going to get owning an 18th Century Sevres porcelain tray.
I picked up this tin tray in Versailles and is the closest I am ever going to get owning an 18th Century Sevres porcelain tray.

Don’t give your heart

In my servitude

I brought pleasure to others

But never my heart

or “The tragic fate of the first thinking biscuit”

What lovely flowers!

The biscuit thought on the tray

Then someone ate it

 

Welcome to TJ’s Household Challenge! If you would like to participate in this challenge then you can use any aspect of the household item for an inspiration. “Tray” could be the tray itself, its materials, the style, where it came from, what it carries…be creative! It does not have to be a valuable tray…just whatever is about at home.

If you are participating please add your contribution as a link to your post in the comment section and add “TJ’s Household Haiku Challenge” to your tag list on your own post so others can find you! Just click on the speech bubble at the end of this post to access comments.

If you would like more information about the challenge then you can view the instructions page HERE

Many thanks to the contributors to the “Mirror” challenge. You can enjoy their contributions by clicking on the links below…

A very clever haiku from Tucked Into a Corner

https://tuckedintoacorner.wordpress.com/2015/05/10/the-looking-glass/

A great interpretation from Ladyleemanila

https://ladyleemanila.wordpress.com/2015/05/10/mirror-mirror-tjs-household-haiku-challenge-9/

A thoughtful musing from “Eat Me” blog

https://wormwoodwriting.wordpress.com/2015/05/12/mirror/

About the objects

This is a tray I found at Versailles amongst the assorted souvenirs devoted to Marie Antoinette. It is a replica of an 18th Century Sevres porcelain tray. What I quite liked about it was that it is actually made in England of tin. In an age where everything seems to be made in China I like to think of a factory in England chugging out tin replicas of French porcelain. The glasses are early Victorian cut glass, the cakes are now gone. There is a milchglas vase in the background with hand painted enamelled flowers.

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