Fleur-de-lis

I highly recommend taking your flower shots from below with the ceiling as the background.
I highly recommend taking your flower shots from below with the ceiling as the background.

A trip to our local provider of quality fruit and vegetables, “The Spud Shed” furnished me with some tulips and irises which now brighten up our sitting room.

Attempting to photograph them attractively after a rather passe front on shot, I decided to grovel on the floor and snap them from below. I was pleased to find that on macro setting and with the ceiling as the background that the shots looked like an outdoor view of a field and had a rather pleasant Japanese-like starkness about them.

So this is my hint for floral photography. Macro from below.

Tulip in close.
Tulip in close.

Irises are supposedly the origin of the French Fleur-de-lys. According to Pierre-Augustin Boissier de Sauvages, an 18th-century French naturalist and lexicographer the name stemmed from the fact that the original Franks, before moving to Gaul lived in marshy areas near the river Luts in the Netherlands where this flower grew. This area had a native form of yellow Iris, also known in Old English as the Fleur-de-luce and and the river Luts was also knows as Lits so in a world where spelling changed continuously it seems likely that this golden Iris (The flower of Luts) became the Fleur-de-lys and a symbol of the kings of France.

Here are the same flowers in the vase blending busily with the gew-gaws in the cabinet.
Here are the same flowers in the vase blending busily with the gew-gaws in the cabinet.

In response to In a Vase on Monday: https://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com/2015/07/13/in-a-vase-on-monday-remastered/

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4 Comments

  1. Unseasonal blooms indeed, but stylishly displayed – the macro shot from below was lovely. Thanks for the origins of ‘fleur-de-lys’ too! Was there nothing in your own garden this week that could have filled a vase?

    Liked by 1 person

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