TJ’s Household Haiku Challenge – Numbers

The changing seasons

Drifting across the surface

Of my house number

Welcome to the latest edition of TJ’s Household Haiku Challenge. Today’s prompt is “House Number” or if you would prefer not to share that then any number around the house.

The first time I went to France I fell in love with the enamel numbers on all of the houses but could not find one to buy. Back in Australia I searched the internet and found a site that sold them for an exorbitant price and so I sighed and let the dream go.

Next time in Paris I went into the hardware section of a department store and found all the numbers in authentic, French made, enamel for not much dosh and so snapped one up.

If I can’t live in a charming maison on the Boulevard St Germain, well….at least I have a French house number.

…oOo…

Thanks so much to the talented people who shared their interpretations of last weeks prompt “Watch”. Some great mind wanderings resulted and I am always in awe of the creative twists and turns that people can make with the constrictive haiku format! Thanks Guys and Gals!

In no particular order!

Azul Zaffre of Behind Distant Doors squirreled away and produced two timely pieces. Lovely!

https://behinddistantdoors.wordpress.com/2016/02/06/watch/

Judy of Edwina’s episodes has gone glam with her bling and other things in her haiku adventure this week. Alluring!

http://edwinasepisodes.com/2016/02/06/tjs-weekly-household-haiku-challenge-watch/

Life home and away has created two brilliant haiku about the finite and the infinite. A great take on the prompt. Tick this one!

https://livehomeandaway.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/time/

Kia’s lead into his 3 very personal haiku is a moving reflection on the impact of time and the importance of family connection. It is a timely reminder to share moments with people you care for. Do have a read.

https://recoveringknowitall.wordpress.com/2016/02/06/for-tjs-household-haiku-challenge-watch/

Welcome back to Pat who has been away from the blogosphere awhile. This very thoughtful collection of haiku and the story of the mickey watch and its connection with a loved one dealing with time is truly moving. Best wishes to you Pat!

http://aseasonandatime.blogspot.com.au/2016/02/t-js-household-haiku-challenge-watch.html

Here is a triplet of haiku from Tucked Into a Corner who has remained “Watchful” for new ways of looking at time. Brilliant!

https://tuckedintoacorner.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/watchful/

Elusive Trope has a brooding image above his three intriguing haiku. I appreciate the value of the broken watch in the first particularly. Don’t be too time bound not to pause and read these!

http://elusivetrope.com/2016/02/07/the-watchmans-tower/

Kat Myrman discovered that time had flown by and has made up for the loss of it by giving us a “two for one” deal. Witty comment on the value of time and when your time is up! Thanks Kat!

https://kmmyrman.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/time-and-bucket-a-haiku/

If you would like to join in the Haiku fun then all you need to do is add a link in the comments section to your own post based on the prompt. We love to see your own images but please feel free to use mine if you like it. Just press the little black speech bubble at the end of this post to access comments.

A little about me: I have always been a fan of haiku and developed an interest through studying and teaching Japanese language and culture for many years (24 and counting). The Japanese idea of creating beauty in minute forms fascinates me. I do not know of any other culture that devotes a regular prime time television slot to a poetry (Haiku) programme and the amount of commentary that the haiku presented generate.

About writing haiku: Basically most Westerners stick to the rules that it is 3 lines long with 5 7 5 syllables. The content is not strictly set but ideally it should have some sort of reference to seasons and the end line should shift the original imagery into an unexpected path.

Japanese haiku is basically 3 lines but the number of syllables can vary. It also has a reference to seasons but often using accepted words that have developed symbolic links to seasons (crickets for example showing summer).

If you try to find an actual definition of a haiku at the end of the day it usually devolves down to…a short poem.

So don’t be daunted by the idea of strict rules. Japanese and English have completely different concept of “Syllables” so I just use 5 7 5 because I enjoy the challenge of choosing words to fit. If yours is 6 7 5 it is still a valid haiku.

So basically go with the flow and let you inner haiku master roam free!

あなたのすごいはいくを楽しみに待っている。ーLooking forward to your amazing haiku!

Weekly Photo Challenge:

 Numbers

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38 Comments

        1. Merci beaucoup. L’amour was not high on the list this weekend with various family dramas of the non romantic sort alas but we soldier on cause that’s what us grown ups do. :/ 🙂 Hope yours was much more delightful. 🙂

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          1. Oh gosh, TJ–I’m sorry for the family dramas, ‘specially on a day we celebrate amour. Breaks my heart to hear this, though I know you’re not alone–lots of unhappy folks, sadly. And soldiering on–gosh, we must be troopers, hard as it is sometimes. Please be assured you’re all in my prayers. On my end, I have a huge lasagna ready to go in the oven… 🙂

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          2. Thanks so much for you lovely wishes. I really appreciate them. Families are like seasons with sunshine and rain. We have to cope with the storms but they will pass and prayers and friends make all the difference. Mmmm, lasagna! One of my favorite dishes. Blessings! TJ

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    1. I am pretty sure it was in the basement hardware section of le BHV Marais store on the rue Rivoli. They had a great range and I think the numbers, which were definitely enamel and not just printed tin cost about 14 euros at the time. I had a quick look on street view and am pretty sure that is where I found them but it was 4 years ago. Good luck!

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    1. Brilliant! In all senses of the word. Great image and haiku. As a secret Luddite it is a perfect comment on the horrors of modern technology. Bring back the sundial I say! Best wishes! TJ

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    1. Love the haiku! It is probably related to the fact that in early hunter gathering societies it was men who handled the tools. I think that men are still fiddling about with their tools today. Hmmm. :/

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    1. What a wonderful poem Pat! The contrast between the sterile census form and the unique and beautiful individuality of the house number you mentioned is a wonderful contrast. Thanks for a lovely read on a Sunday! TJ

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    1. Thanks so much! I am so thrilled you enjoyed what you saw and thank you for the follow. Looking forward to seeing you around cyberspace. Best wishes from Western Australia.

      Liked by 1 person

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